Friday, August 9, 2013

Bisoprolol

What is bisoprolol?

Bisoprolol is in a group of drugs called beta-blockers. Beta-blockers affect the heart and circulation (blood flow through arteries and veins).
Bisoprolol is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure).
Bisoprolol may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about bisoprolol

Do not skip doses or stop taking bisoprolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse or cause other serious heart problems.
If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medicine.
Bisoprolol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of bisoprolol.
Bisoprolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.
Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.

Before taking bisoprolol

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to bisoprolol, or if you have certain serious heart conditions such as"AV block" or slow heart rhythm.
If you have certain conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use bisoprolol . Before you take bisoprolol, tell your doctor if you have:
  • asthma, bronchitis, emphysema;
  • diabetes (taking bisoprolol can make it harder for you to tell when you have low blood sugar);
  • a heart problem such as angina, heart block, slow heart rhythm, or congestive heart failure;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a thyroid disorder; or
  • problems with circulation (such as Raynaud's syndrome).
FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether bisoprolol is harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether bisoprolol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use bisoprolol without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take bisoprolol?

Take bisoprolol exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts or for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.
Take bisoprolol with a full glass of water.
Take bisoprolol at the same time every day.
Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.
Do not skip doses or stop taking bisoprolol without first talking to your doctor. Stopping suddenly may make your condition worse or cause other serious heart problems.
To be sure bisoprolol is helping your condition, your blood pressure will need to be checked on a regular basis. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.
If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using bisoprolol.
Bisoprolol is only part of a complete program of treatment for hypertension that may also include diet, exercise, and weight control. Follow your diet, medication, and exercise routines very closely if you are being treated for hypertension.
Keep using this medicine as directed, even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medication for the rest of your life.
Store bisoprolol at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If your next dose is less than 4 hours away, skip the missed dose and take the medicine at the next regularly scheduled time. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.
Overdose symptoms may include slow heart rate, wheezing or shortness of breath, dizziness, anxiety, confusion, nausea, sweating, pale skin, fainting, and seizure (convulsions).

What should I avoid while taking bisoprolol?

Bisoprolol can cause side effects that may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be awake and alert.
Avoid getting up too fast from a sitting or lying position, or you may feel dizzy. Get up slowly and steady yourself to prevent a fall.
Avoid drinking alcohol. It can increase some of the side effects of bisoprolol.

Bisoprolol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
  • slow, fast, or pounding heartbeats;
  • chest pain, feeling like you might pass out;
  • confusion, hallucinations;
  • feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
  • swelling of your ankles or feet;
  • pain or burning when you urinate; or
  • numbness, tingling, or cold feeling in your hands and feet.
Less serious bisoprolol side effects may include:
  • dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;
  • diarrhea, constipation, increased urination;
  • runny or stuffy nose, ringing in your ears;
  • feeling tired or weak;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • drowsiness, dizziness, spinning sensation;
  • depression, anxiety, restless feeling;
  • joint or muscle pain;
  • mild itching or skin rash; or
  • loss of interest in sex.
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect bisoprolol?

Tell your doctor about all other medications you use, especially:
  • clonidine (Catapres);
  • digitalis (digoxin, Lanoxin);
  • disopyramide (Norpace);
  • guanethidine (Ismelin);
  • rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate);
  • insulin or diabetes medication you take by mouth;
  • another beta-blocker such as atenolol (Tenormin), carvedilol (Coreg), labetalol (Normodyne, Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal, InnoPran), sotalol (Betapace), and others;
  • a heart medication such as nifedipine (Procardia, Adalat), reserpine (Serpasil), verapamil (Calan, Verelan, Isoptin), or diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem); or
  • medicine for asthma or other breathing disorders, such as albuterol (Ventolin, Proventil), bitolterol (Tornalate), metaproterenol (Alupent), pirbuterol (Maxair), terbutaline (Brethaire, Brethine, Bricanyl), and others.
This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with bisoprolol. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

Bactroban

What is Bactroban?

Bactroban contains mupirocin, an antibiotic. Mupirocin prevents bacteria from growing on your skin.
Bactroban is used to treat infections of the skin such as impetigo.
Bactroban may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

Important information about Bactroban.

Use Bactroban for the full amount of time prescribed by your doctor or as recommended in the package even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely healed. Avoid your eyes, nose, mouth, and lips when applying Bactroban. If medication gets in any of these areas, wash with water.
Watch for signs of improvement in 3 to 5 days. If your condition gets worse or does not improve, see your doctor.

Who should not use Bactroban?

Do not use Bactroban if you have ever had an allergic reaction to mupirocin.
You may not be able to use Bactroban if you have a very large open wound. This medication contains polyethylene glycol, which may cause damage to your kidneys if too much drug is absorbed through your skin.
Bactroban is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is unlikely to harm an unborn baby. Do not use Bactroban without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Mupirocin passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing infant. Do not use this medicine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use Bactroban?

Use Bactroban exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these instructions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
Wash your hands before and after using Bactroban.
Clean and dry the affected area. Apply a small amount of the ointment as directed.
Use Bactroban for the full amount of time prescribed by your doctor or as recommended in the package even if you begin to feel better. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely healed.
You should notice improvement in 3 to 5 days. If the infection gets worse or does not improve, consult your doctor.
Do not use bandages that do not allow air circulation over the affected area unless otherwise directed by your doctor. A light, cotton-gauze dressing may be used to protect clothing.
Avoid getting Bactroban in your eyes, nose, or mouth or in large, open wounds.
Store this medicine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the dose you missed and apply only the regular amount. Do not use a double dose of this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of Bactroban is rare. Consult a doctor if you suspect an overdose. No symptoms of an overdose are known.
If Bactroban gets in your eyes or mouth, rinse with water.
If this medication is ingested, seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while using Bactroban?

Avoid using other topical preparations on the same area at the same time unless directed to do so by your doctor.

Bactroban side effects

Serious side effects are not expected to occur with Bactroban therapy. Stop using this medicine and see your doctor if you experience unusual blistering, itching, redness, peeling, dryness, or irritation of the skin.
Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Bactroban?

Other topical medications may change the way that your skin absorbs Bactroban. Avoid using other products on the same area at the same time unless directed to do so by your doctor.

Thursday, August 8, 2013

Butrans

What is Butrans?

Butrans (buprenorphine)is an opioid pain medication. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic.
Butrans transdermal (skin patch) is used to treat moderate to severe chronic pain when treatment is needed around the clock.
Butrans is not for treating pain just after surgery, or for treating occasional short-term pain.
Butrans transdermal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about Butrans

You should not use Butrans if you are allergic to buprenorphine, or if you have a severe breathing disorder such as asthma, or a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.
Never wear more than one Butrans skin patch at a time unless your doctor has told you to.
Do not expose the Butrans skin patch to heat while you are wearing it. Heat can increase the amount of drug you absorb through your skin and may cause harmful effects.
Call your doctor at once if you have weak or shallow breathing, snoring that is new or unusual, slow heart rate, confusion, severe dizziness, seizure, or feeling like you might pass out.
Avoid letting another person handle your Butrans skin patches. Keep both used and unused patches out of the reach of children or pets. The amount of buprenorphine in a used skin patch could be fatal to a child or pet who accidentally sucks or chews on it. Seek emergency medical attention if this happens. Do not stop using Butrans suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms.
Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using Butrans.

Before using Butrans

You should not use Butrans if you are allergic to buprenorphine, or if you have:
  • asthma or severe breathing disorder; or
  • a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.
Do not use Butrans if you have used an MAO inhibitor such as furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate) in the last 14 days. Serious, life threatening side effects can occur if you use Butrans before the MAO inhibitor has cleared from your body.
To make sure you can safely use Butrans, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;
  • a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome:
  • hepatitis B or C;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • curvature of the spine;
  • a history of head injury or brain tumor;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • Addison's disease or other adrenal gland disorders;
  • enlarged prostate, urination problems;
  • depression or other mental illness; or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.
Butrans may be habit-forming and should be used only by the person it was prescribed for. Never share Butrans patches with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.
FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether buprenorphine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Butrans. Buprenorphine can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using Butrans.

Your dose needs may be different if you have recently used an opioid pain medicine and your body is tolerant to it. Opioids include Tylenol #3, Lortab, Vicodin, Exalgo, OxyContin, Percocet, Actiq, Duragesic, Methadose, Dolophine, Kadian, MS Contin, Oramorph, Opana, and many others. Talk with your doctor if you are not sure you are opioid-tolerant.

How should I use Butrans?

Use Butrans exactly as prescribed. Never use Butrans patches in larger amounts, or for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Tell your doctor if the medicine seems to stop working as well in relieving your pain.
Butrans patches comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.
If you are switching to Butrans transdermal from another narcotic pain medicine, you may need to slowly stop using the other medicine. Follow your doctor's instructions.
Apply the Butrans skin patch only to clean, dry skin. Use only clear water to wash the skin before you apply a skin patch. Soaps or other chemicals could increase the amount of buprenorphine your skin absorbs.
Apply the Butrans patch to a flat and hairless area of the chest, back, side, or outer side of your upper arm. Wear the patch around the clock for 7 days. Never wear more than one Butrans skin patch at a time unless your doctor has told you to.
Do not use a Butrans transdermal skin patch if it has been cut or damaged.
After removing a skin patch fold it in half, sticky side in, and flush the patch down the toilet or use the Patch-Disposal Unit provided with this medication. Apply a new patch to a different skin area on the chest, back, side, or upper arm. Do not use the same skin area twice in a row.
Never share Butrans with another person, even if they have the same symptoms you have. Ask your doctor how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when you stop using Butrans. Keep both used and unused Butrans skin patches out of the reach of children or pets. The amount of buprenorphine in a used skin patch could be fatal to a child or pet who accidentally sucks or chews on the patch. Seek emergency medical attention if this happens.
Keep track of how many skin patches have been used from each new package of this medication. Buprenorphine is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if any person in the household is using this medicine improperly or without a prescription.
Store Butrans at room temperature. Keep each patch in its foil pouch until you are ready to use it.

What happens if I miss a dose?

If you forget to change a patch on your scheduled day, remove the patch and apply a new one as soon as you remember. Do not wear extra patches to make up a missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. The amount of buprenorphine in a used or unused skin patch can be fatal to a child who accidentally sucks or chews on the patch.
Overdose symptoms may include extreme drowsiness, weak or limp feeling, weak pulse, cold and clammy skin, fainting, shallow breathing, snoring, or breathing that stops.

What should I avoid while using Butrans?

Do not drink alcohol or you may have serious, life-threatening side effects. Buprenorphine may impair your thinking or reactions. Avoid driving or operating machinery until you know how Butrans will affect you. Do not expose the skin patch to heat while you are wearing it. This includes a hot tub, heating pad, electric blanket, sauna, heated water bed, or a hot bath. Avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds. Heat can increase the amount of drug you absorb through your skin and may cause harmful effects.
Avoid letting another person handle your Butrans skin patches. If the sticky side of a skin patch comes into contact with another person, wash the skin with clear water and seek medical care at once.

Butrans side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Butrans: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Butrans and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:
  • slow heart rate, weak or shallow breathing, deep sighs, snoring that is new or unusual;
  • confusion, severe dizziness, feeling like you might pass out;
  • blisters, swelling, or severe irritation where the patch was worn;
  • seizure (convulsions); or
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).
Less serious Butrans side effects may include:
  • headache;
  • vomiting, dry mouth, upset stomach, constipation;
  • mild dizziness or drowsiness; or
  • redness, itching, or mild skin rash where the patch was worn.
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Butrans?

Tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that can make you sleepy or slow your breathing (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, anti-nausea medicine, other narcotic pain medicines, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, heart rhythm medications, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to the side effects of buprenorphine and dangerous side effects may result.
  • dexamethasone (Decadron, Hexadrol);
  • St. John's wort;
  • rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate), or rifapentine (Priftin);
  • phenobarbital (Solfoton) or other barbiturates;
  • diazepam (Valium) or similar medicines such as alprazolam (Xanax), lorazepam (Ativan), clorazepate (Tranxene), and others;
  • a heart rhythm medication such as amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), dofetilide (Tikosyn), flecaininde (Tambocor), procainamide (Pronestyl), propafenone, (Rythmol), quinidine (Quin-G), sotalol (Betapace), and others;
  • HIV medication such as efavirenz (Sustiva), etravirine (Intelence), nevirapine (Viramune), or ritonavir (Kaletra, Norvir); or
  • seizure medication such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol), felbamate (Felbatol), oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), phenytoin (Dilantin), or primidone (Mysoline).
This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Butrans. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Brilinta


What is Brilinta?

Brilinta (ticagrelor) keeps the platelets in your blood from coagulating (clotting) to prevent unwanted blood clots that can occur with certain heart or blood vessel conditions.
Brilinta is used to lower your risk of having a stroke or serious heart problems after you have had a heart attack or severe chest pain (angina).
Brilinta may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about Brilinta

You should not use Brilinta if you have severe liver disease, any active bleeding (including a bleeding stomach ulcer), or a history of bleeding in the brain. Do not use this medicine just before heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).
You may need to stop using Brilinta for at least 5 days before having surgery or dental work, to prevent excessive bleeding. Do not stop taking this medicine without first talking to your doctor, even if you have signs of bleeding. Stopping Brilinta may increase your risk of a heart attack or stroke.
Brilinta may cause you to bleed more easily, which can be severe or life-threatening. Avoid activities that may increase your risk of bleeding or injury.
Call your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if you have bleeding that will not stop. You may also have bleeding on the inside of your body, such as in your stomach or intestines. Call your doctor at once if you have black or bloody stools, red or pink urine, or if you cough up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds. These could be signs of bleeding in your digestive tract.
Many drugs (including some over-the-counter medicines and herbal products) can cause serious medical problems if you take them with Brilinta. It is very important to tell your doctor about all medicines you have recently used.

Before taking Brilinta

You should not use Brilinta if you are allergic to ticagrelor, or if you have:
  • severe liver disease;
  • any active bleeding;
  • stomach ulcer or bleeding; or
  • a history of bleeding in the brain (such as from a head injury).
Do not use this medicine within 5 days before heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).
To make sure Brilinta is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:
  • liver disease;
  • asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder) or other breathing problem;
  • a history of stomach ulcer or colon polyps;
  • a history of stroke; or
  • a history of bleeding or blood clotting disorder.
Brilinta may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have:
  • a recent surgery or bleeding injury;
  • a disease affecting the blood vessels in your brain;
  • a history of stroke;
  • a history of bleeding problems;
  • a history of stomach or intestinal bleeding; or
  • if you are 65 or older.
FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Brilinta will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.
It is not known whether ticagrelor passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

How should I take Brilinta?

Take Brilinta exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.
Brilinta should be taken together with aspirin. Follow your doctor's instructions about how much aspirin you should take.
Do not take more aspirin than your doctor has prescribed. Taking too much aspirin can make this medicine less effective.
Brilinta can be taken with or without food. Take the medicine at the same time each day.
Because Brilinta keeps your blood from coagulating (clotting), this medicine can also make it easier for you to bleed, even from a minor injury. Contact your doctor or seek emergency medical attention if you have any bleeding that will not stop.
Any doctor, dentist, surgeon, or other medical care provider who treats you should know that you are taking Brilinta. You may need to stop using the medicine for at least 5 days before having surgery or dental work, to prevent excessive bleeding. Follow your doctor's instructions and start taking Brilinta again as soon as possible.
Do not stop taking Brilinta without first talking to your doctor, even if you have signs of bleeding. Use this medicine regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely. Stopping Brilinta may increase your risk of a heart attack or stroke.
Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.
See also: Brilinta dosage (in more detail)

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. Overdose can cause excessive bleeding.

What should I avoid while taking Brilinta?

While you are taking Brilinta, do not take NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) without your doctor's advice. NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others.
Avoid activities that may increase your risk of bleeding or injury. Use extra care to prevent bleeding while shaving or brushing your teeth.
Avoid drinking alcohol. It may increase your risk of bleeding in your stomach or intestines.
Ask a doctor or pharmacist before using any cold, allergy, pain, or sleep medication. Aspirin (sometimes abbreviated as ASA) is contained in many combination medicines. Taking certain products together can cause you to get too much aspirin which can increase your risk of bleeding. Check the label to see if a medicine contains aspirin or ASA.

Brilinta side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Brilinta: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
Call your doctor at once if you have:
  • nosebleed or other bleeding that will not stop;
  • bloody or tarry stools, blood in your urine;
  • coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • red or pink urine:
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body;
  • sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance;
  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding (nose, mouth, vagina, or rectum), purple or red pinpoint spots under your skin;
  • pale skin, weakness, fever, or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
  • if you feel light-headed or short of breath, even with mild exertion or while lying down.
Common Brilinta side effects may include:
  • headache, mild dizziness;
  • cough; or
  • nausea, diarrhea.
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Brilinta?

Many drugs can interact with Brilinta. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your medications and any you start or stop using during treatment with Brilinta, especially:
  • bosentan;
  • dexamethasone;
  • digoxin;
  • imatinib;
  • nefazodone;
  • St. John's wort;
  • an antibiotic--clarithromycin, telithromycin;
  • antifungal medication--itraconazole, ketoconazole, posaconazole, voriconazole;
  • a blood thinner (heparin, warfarin, Coumadin);
  • cholesterol-lowering medication such as lovastatin or simvastatin;
  • heart medication--nicardipine, quinidine;
  • hepatitis C medications--boceprevir, telaprevir;
  • HIV/AIDS medication--atazanavir, delavirdine, efavirenz, fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, nevirapine, ritonavir, saquinavir;
  • seizure medication--carbamazepine, fosphenytoin, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, primidone; or
  • tuberculosis medication--rifabutin, rifampin, rifapentine.
This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with ticagrelor. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

Biaxin

What is Biaxin?

Biaxin (clarithromycin) is a macrolide antibiotic. It fights bacteria in your body.
Biaxin is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections affecting the skin and respiratory system. It is also used together with other medicines to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori.
Biaxin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about Biaxin

You should not use Biaxin if you are allergic to clarithromycin, or to similar medicines such as azithromycin (Zithromax), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole), or telithromycin (Ketek).
You should not use Biaxin if you have a life-threatening heart rhythm disorder, a history of Long QT syndrome, if you have ever had jaundice or liver problems caused by taking Biaxin, or if you have liver or kidney disease and are also taking colchicine (Colcrys).
Do not use Biaxin if you are also using any of the drugs listed below. They can interact with Biaxin and cause serious or life-threatening side effects:
  • cisapride (Propulsid);
  • pimozide (Orap);
  • lovastatin (Mevacor, Altoprev, Advicor) or simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin); or
  • ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Ergostat, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), or dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal Nasal Spray).
Take this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Biaxin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.

Before taking Biaxin

You should not use Biaxin if you are allergic to clarithromycin or to similar medicines such as azithromycin (Zithromax), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole), or telithromycin (Ketek).
You should not use this medication if you have a life-threatening heart rhythm disorder, a history of Long QT syndrome, if you have ever had jaundice or liver problems caused by taking Biaxin, or if you have liver or kidney disease and are also taking colchicine (Colcrys).
Do not use Biaxin if you are also using any of the drugs listed below. They can interact with Biaxin and cause serious or life-threatening side effects:
  • cisapride (Propulsid);
  • pimozide (Orap);
  • lovastatin (Mevacor, Altoprev, Advicor) or simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin); or
  • ergot medicine such as ergotamine (Ergomar, Ergostat, Cafergot, Ercaf, Wigraine), or dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal Nasal Spray).
To make sure you can safely take Biaxin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:
  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • myasthenia gravis;
  • porphyria;
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);
  • a family history of Long QT syndrome; or
  • if you take any of these heart rhythm medications -- amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone), disopyramide (Norpace), dofetilide (Tikosyn), flecainide (Tambocor), dronedarone (Multaq), ibutilide (Corvert), mexiletine (Mexitil), procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl), propafenone, (Rythmol), quinidine (Quin-G), or sotalol (Betapace).
FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Biaxin will harm an unborn baby. Before you take Biaxin, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether clarithromycin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
Do not give Biaxin to a child younger than 6 months of age.
Older adults may be more likely to have side effects on heart rhythm, including a life-threatening fast heart rate.

How should I take Biaxin?

Take Biaxin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.
You may take Biaxin tablets and oral suspension (liquid) with or without food.
Biaxin extended-release tablets (Biaxin XL) should be taken with food.
Do not crush, chew, or break an extended-release tablet. Swallow it whole. Breaking the pill may cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.
Shake the oral suspension (liquid) well just before you measure a dose. Measure the liquid with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup, not with a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.
Take Biaxin for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics. Biaxin will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or flu.
Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not keep the oral liquid in a refrigerator.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.
Overdose symptoms may include severe stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

What should I avoid while taking Biaxin?

Antibiotic medicines can cause diarrhea, which may be a sign of a new infection. If you have diarrhea that is watery or bloody, stop taking Biaxin and call your doctor. Do not use anti-diarrhea medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Biaxin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Biaxin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.
Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:
  • headache with chest pain and severe dizziness, fast or pounding heartbeats, shortness of breath, fainting;
  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
  • fever, swollen glands, body aches, flu symptoms, new or worsening cough;
  • skin rash, easy bruising or bleeding, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;
  • confusion, vomiting, swelling, rapid weight gain, urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • problems with your hearing; or
  • severe skin reaction -- fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain, followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.
Biaxin may also cause severe liver symptoms. Stop taking this medicine and call your doctor at once if you have any of these liver symptoms:
  • low fever, itching;
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, loss of appetite;
  • dark urine, clay colored stools; or
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes).
Less serious Biaxin side effects may include:
  • upset stomach, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • unusual or unpleasant taste in your mouth;
  • tooth discoloration;
  • headache;
  • mild itching or rash; or
  • vaginal itching or discharge.
This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Biaxin?

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:
  • a blood thinner such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);
  • colchicine (Colcrys);
  • itraconazole (Sporanox);
  • omeprazole (Prilosec);
  • ranitidine bismuth citrate (Tritec);
  • sildenafil (Viagra), tadalafil (Adcirca, Cialis), or vardenafil (Levitra);
  • theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Theochron, Uniphyl);
  • tolterodine (Detrol);
  • any other antibiotic, especially rifabutin (Mycobutin), rifapentine (Priftin), or rifampin (Rifater, Rifadin, Rifamate);
  • cholesterol-lowering medicines such as atorvastatin (Lipitor, Caduet), pravastatin (Pravachol), and others;
  • drugs that weaken your immune system, such as cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune, Gengraf), tacrolimus (Prograf), or steroids;
  • heart medication such as amlodipine (Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxicaps, Lanoxin), diltiazem (Cartia, Cardizem), verapamil (Calan, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan), and others;
  • HIV medicines such as atazanavir (Reyataz), efavirenz (Sustiva, Atripla), nevirapine (Viramune), ritonavir (Norvir, Kaletra), saquinavir (Invirase), or zidovudine (Retrovir);
  • insulin or oral diabetes medication;
  • a sedative such as alprazolam (Xanax), midazolam (Versed), or triazolam (Halcion); or
  • seizure medications such as carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol), phenytoin (Dilantin), and valproic acid (Depakote, Depakene).
This list is not complete and there are many other drugs that can interact with Biaxin. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to any healthcare provider who treats you.